Trek Domane Review

Trek Domane Review

 

the vibration of the cobbles – serious suspension would be needed to do that – but felt surprisingly good despite the fitment of carbon-fibre deep-section Bontrager Aeolus 5 D3 wheels.

 

A back-to-back with a Madone would have been useful, but more so were the

 

IsoSpeed cover is retained by a screw

sections of Belgian bike path and broken back-roads tarmac we tackled, on which the Trek Domane felt truly at home. Indeed, the general impression was that the rear end is significantly better at suppressing vibration than is the fork and handlebar setup. For most riders over a long day’s ride, saddle comfort will

…………………………………………………………………..

“Given the clear effectiveness

of IsoSpeed, however, we’d

expect to see it more widely

used in the near future; for sure,

I’d take an H2 fit Domane

over the Madone wherever

the roads are rough.”

…………………………………………………………………..

 

be the critical consideration and it is hard to see how Trek could have found a mechanism for the front end to match the elegant simplicity and effectiveness of IsoSpeed.

 

If CTR has a question over the Trek Domane, it concerns sizing. The frame features a head tube slightly higher than the equivalent Madone H2 fitment, putting it somewhere between H2 and H3. This, combined with a 5mm shorter top tube, meant I could not get my handlebars just the right height even with a “slammed” 14cm stem. Trek says the sizing is designed to offer a more comfortable riding position with greater control over the cycle, which is a reasonable aspiration even if it limits handlebar adjustment.

 

The Wisconsin firm also says the Domane is a competition cycle, which is also fair enough given its superb power transfer and roughly 1050g frame weight including 100g of IsoSpeed parts.


 
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