Trek Domane Review

Trek Domane Review

 

IsoSpeed is not the Trek Domane’s only trick. In the search for stability it employs, compared to the Madone, a lower bottom bracket height, steeper seat angle, shallower head angle and increased fork rake along with 10mm longer chainstays. The additional fork rake comes with but not thanks to added curvature of the blades, which are themselves better able to deflect over bumps.

 

To keep rake to the desired dimension, the dropouts are underslung in a style described by Trek as unique. It looks very similar to the design of Cannondale’s SuperSix Evo fork.

 

Be that as it may, the fork, which also goes by the name IsoSpeed, offers a claimed 5percent reduction in vertical and 30percent increase in lateral stiffness – important to steering precision and stability – compared to what Trek calls a “2012 best-in-class fork”.

 

For best results, the Trek Domane fork is intended to be used with the new Bontrager IsoZone handlebar, which features recesses along the tops and the upper surfaces of the drop sections and in which sit lightweight closed-cell foam pads. The recesses keep the cross-section of the bars acceptably small when wrapped with tape.

 

There a couple more noteworthy features in the Trek Domane: there is clearance for 25c tyres and mudguards, and there are in the four dropouts little threaded inserts, as used recently in the Fisher Cronus, that take bosses for mounting mudguard stays.

…………………………………………………………………..

“so much for the tech;

what you probably want to

know now is, did Mr Hallett

actually like riding the Domane?”

…………………………………………………………………..

 

Underslung dropouts on the Domane’s IsoZone fork

 

 

 

 
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