Sabbath Mondays Child Review

Sabbath Mondays Child Review

 

Although the frame looks quite different from other titanium designs on the market, angles and proportions are consistent with road racing tradition. The head tube is sensible at 15.5 centimeters for the medium, the top tube a generous 56 centimeters, and head and seat tube angles are both 73 degrees. The frame is matched with a Deddaciai Black Fin all-carbon fork. The aerodynamic profile fork is all-carbon minus aluminium dropouts and weighs a respectable 390 grams.

 

Neat rear dropout on the Mondays Child, fortunately replaceable...
Neat rear dropout on the Mondays Child, fortunately replaceable…

 

The frame certainly isn’t the lightest offering available at 1.5 kilos; titanium splits the difference between carbon and steel on the scale. Many carbon frames weigh in at a kilo or less, while steel frames frequently approach 2 kilos. The Sabbath team mentioned a SRAM Red-equipped bike in their stable about 400 grams heavier than a comparably-equipped Trek Project One, a bike very close to UCI 6.8 kilo weight limit. What do you get for that extra 400 grams? One of the best framesets we’ve ridden.

 

Dedacciai front fork is stiff and precise and matches the frame nicely
Dedacciai front fork is stiff and precise and matches the frame nicely

 

Riding The Sabbath Mondays Child

 

The significance of Sabbath’s tube shaping and frame design magic are most apparent when riding their Silk Road and Mondays Child one after the other. Both bikes are all-titanium construction, but the frame designs result in distinctive ride and handling qualities.

 

We rode and raced the Silk Road earlier in the year; the frame was comfortable thanks to a taller head tube, compliant ride, and short top tube. Yet it was still snappy enough to get you up the road when power was put to pedal.

 

Mondays Child head tube is flared to incorporate integrated headset
Mondays Child head tube is flared to incorporate integrated headset

 

The Mondays Child is an altogether different beast, with a focus on accessible performance for the enthusiast. According to Andrew, the Mondays Child, “…whilst still racy it is not completely at the race end of the spectrum, requiring large saddle to bar drop. We wanted to make a feisty bike that could be ridden comfortably by the enthusiast as well as the competition rider.”

 

Over the weather and traffic-beaten roads of England, the Sabbath rode very similarly to the Ritchey Logic steel bike we tested earlier in the year. Although not as compliant as the touring-oriented Silk Road over the rough stuff, the Monday’s Child still impressed. The frame and Dedacciai Black Fin fork absorbed most shock where many other race framesets would have skittered the rider down the road. This capacity inspired great confidence when the roads became twisty and bumpy. The Monday’s Child was not fazed when lean angles increased over broken surfaces. Our bike maintained composure even when an unexpected 2 inch stone threw the front wheel off line.

 

Sabbath's head tube and main tubes present a large surface area in order to provide solid welds
Sabbath’s head tube and main tubes present a large surface area in order to provide solid welds

 
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